Tag Archives: HBCUs

African American Corporate Executives: HBCUs Need You!

The expertise and connections of African American corporate executives can help chart a sustainable future for historically black colleges and universities.

hbcu, historically black collegesHistorically black colleges and universities are amongst the largest African American controlled businesses in America. Many date back to the 19th century.  They have educated generations and built the black middle class. They are major employers in communities across the country. They also face well-documented challenges as they operate in an increasingly competitive educational marketplace.

These challenges can be addressed through a deep and meaningful partnership with African American corporate executives. These executives have increased corporate profits, managed turnarounds, introduced new products, increased employment, expanded operations, managed globalization, developed new technologies, and introduced social media to market and sell their products. Their expertise and management skills – when combined with that of academic leaders and trustees – can creatively and strategically address higher-education challenges in areas such as recruitment, retention and graduation; finances; marketing; and fundraising including alumni giving, corporate, foundation, state and federal support.

African American corporate executives can serve as executive coaches and mentors to presidents and chancellors, shadowing these leaders and working with them to provide additional strategies, perspective and potential solutions gained from their corporate experience.  They can volunteer to serve as trustees providing HBCUs with the same level of professionalism they would bring to a corporate board. They can serve as interim-presidents acting as change agents who help address unresolved structural challenges. They can serve on a corporate leadership team – joining with their peers – to provide management expertise and connections that can transform institutions. Such a team can surround and support the president and trustees helping to resolve challenges and take advantage of unleveraged opportunities.

Corporate executives can also provide funding and resources needed to stabilize our HBCUs. They can build endowments. They can ensure the continued competitiveness of HBCUs through timely capital investments in facilities, equipment and technology. Mutually beneficial strategic collaborations can support corporations who place a premium on attracting and retaining a diverse talent.

When the White House or a state governor needs top talent they often turn to the private sector, calling upon the patriotism of corporate executives, asking them to take a leave of absence to serve their fellow citizens. Today we need African American executives to heed the call to service. HBCUs provide a special brand of higher education. They play a critical role in educating African American, Hispanic and first generation students who seek an education that will allow them to fully participate in the global economy and build a strong future for themselves and their families.

Increased “business know-how” and financial investment can help HBCUs continue to play a key role in addressing educational disparities. Reach out to these institutions, share your know-how, and help them grow to the next level.  Volunteer now!

Photo credit: HBCUBuzz

Mel and Pearl Shaw are the authors of “Prerequisites for Fundraising Success” and “The Fundraiser’s Guide to Soliciting Gifts.” They provide fundraising counsel to nonprofits. Visit them at www.saadandshaw.com. Follow them on Twitter: @saadshaw.

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Encouraged and optimistic: African American philanthropy and museums

Part one of a three part series

Grace Stanislaus

Photo credit: Rodger Allen

“Self-empowerment is one among many strategies people of African descent have employed to ensure our survival in the New World. This includes the creation of museums and cultural centers that document, recognize and celebrate the art, culture, history and contributions of African Americans. These institutions, many of which were established as a result of public/private partnerships, bear testimony to the hard battles fought to bring dreams to fruition.”

Arts professional and nonprofit CEO Grace C. Stanislaus is encouraged by the very existence of museums and cultural centers such as the National Museum of African American History and Culture, The Studio Museum in Harlem, the California African American Museum, the DuSable Museum of Art, the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History, The Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland, and the Museum of the African Diaspora (MoAD). With 20+ years experience directing and building arts institutions Stanislaus shares her perspective on African American arts and culture institutions and philanthropy.

“I consider the existence of these institutions remarkable especially in light of the history of enslavement, oppression, discrimination and economic, social, cultural and political disenfranchisement,” Stanislaus commented. “But not so remarkable in the context of a parallel history, dating back to the 18th century, of civic and charitable giving that supported and in turn generated support from mutual aid societies, the Black Church, and fraternities and sororities.”

She reminds us of the important role historically black colleges and universities have played. “HBCUs such as Clark Atlanta, Hampton, Howard, Fisk, North Carolina Central and Tuskegee, played significant roles in establishing galleries and museums to house, preserve, interpret, display, and celebrate African American art, artists, and cultural achievements.

When asked about the future of these arts institutions Stanislaus recommend an internal examination and a close look at external funding realities.

“We need dynamic visions and robust programs that engage diverse constituencies. Staff and board leaders need to ask questions that can reveal best practices. These include: Are our organizations and programs relevant and of interest to our local communities? Do we advocate effectively within our communities for the value that we add? Are we building loyalty? Are our program offerings broad in ways that engages diverse, cross cultural audiences? Are we allocating sufficient resources to market and promote and to raise funds for our museums and programs? Are we investing in the professional development of our staff? Have we found the right balance between our scholarly mission and our commercial interests? Do we have a strategic plan, program plan and business plan that guide our decisions and the allocation of our resources? Are our mission, values and vision clear and being effectively communicated to our community/stakeholders? Do we have a succession plan for the executive and the board leadership? This particular item has derailed the progress forward of many of our cultural organizations.”

Part Two: Encouraged and optimistic: Pressing Questions, Limited resources and support of the arts

Part Three: Encouraged and optimistic: If you build it they will come…good business model?

Photo credit: Rodger Allen

Contact Grace C. Stanislaus at gcsart@aol.com

Mel and Pearl Shaw are the authors of “Prerequisites for Fundraising Success” and “The Fundraiser’s Guide to Soliciting Gifts.” They provide fundraising counsel to nonprofits. Visit them at www.saadandshaw.com. Follow them @saadshaw.