How to keep a fundraising job

Part two in a two part series.

fundraising, fundraising career, tips for development directors, how to succeed in fundraising, executive director and development director relationships, president and vice president for advancement relationshipsWe have seen nonprofit executive directors and college presidents pull their hair out over their relationship – or lack of a relationship – with their development staff. There are magic words development professionals say that pour gasoline on a slow smoldering fire. Here are a few.

“I don’t have enough staff.” While this may be true, it is not a conversation starter. You must effectively deploy current staff before requesting more. A staffing request should be accompanied by a plan showing how new staff will increase revenue over-and-above the added salary line. “The event was a great friendraiser.” A fundraising event that fails to meet goal is not a successful friendraiser. “We couldn’t meet the proposal deadline….” There is no reason to miss a proposal submission date: plan ahead, and submit in advance.

“The annual appeal didn’t go out until January.” It doesn’t matter that it was ready to go on December 27th. Year end appeals should go out in October. November at the latest. “I am heading up a community solicitation program for the chamber.” Yes, your boss wanted you more involved with the community, but not like this. “Can you meet with a potential, major gift prospect in the next five minutes?” The point is you have to coordinate donor and funder visits with your executive. “I have a personality conflict with the chair of the alumni association.” Managing relationships is a key responsibility for a development professional. You cannot alienate one of your most important constituencies.

“The person with that information is out on sick leave.” This classic drives executives crazy. It doesn’t matter that it’s true: you need backup systems and cross-trained staff. “We are waiting on ABC foundation to take us over the top.” Too often this is the gift that never arrives. Don’t wait for a gift to make your goal: keep working a pool of prospects with the capacity to give three times your goal. “We made goal, but all gifts are restricted.” We know this is an exaggeration, but there’s a grain of truth: be careful with gift counting.

Here are a few other favorites: “Can you attend a check presentation of $1,000 in Chicago?” “I can’t tell you how much we raised because of a computer problem.” “Mr. Longwinded volunteered to make remarks at the grand opening.” Two more that are sure to annoy: asking for a raise when you haven’t met an agreed-upon, reasonable fundraising goal, and offering one-of-a-kind naming opportunities to more than one donor.

Here’s a tip for fundraisers who want to strengthen their relationship with their executive: You are the “subject matter expert”: Suggest potential solutions instead of leading with problems. Provide a weekly report with funds raised, prospects contacted, and important dates to remember.

Photo credit: Briana Miller http://breakcomics.blogspot.com

Mel and Pearl Shaw are the authors of “Prerequisites for Fundraising Success” and “The Fundraiser’s Guide to Soliciting Gifts.” They provide fundraising counsel to nonprofits. Visit them at www.saadandshaw.com. Follow them on Twitter: @saadshaw.

Statements fund development professionals hate to hear

Part one in a two part series.

congratsDo you wonder why you can’t keep development staff? Maybe it is “their fault.” Or maybe your expectations have people running for the door. Here is a short list of things executive directors and college presidents have been known to say that get development staff running to monster.com. Do you hear yourself in these comments? What can you do to change?

  1. “Let my assistant to arrange a time for us to talk.” This is a favorite because it often takes weeks to secure an appointment.
  2. “Once you have done your homework, call me and I will close the deal.” Does this make any sense? How many nonprofit leaders are so sought after that their presence at the point of solicitation will “close the deal?”
  3. “It’s your job to raise the money.” This belief is a luxury no executive can afford. Regardless the number of development professionals employed, you are the chief fundraiser. Your staff’s ability to raise money requires your active participation.
  4. “I want you to make at least 20 calls a week. Another favorite. Who will your staff call, who will want to talk with them, and what are they calling donors about?
  5. “I want you to chair the homecoming dance committee.” There are many variations on this theme: all pull development staff away from fundraising. Unless there are clear revenue goals keep your development staff out of events.
  6. “Have you asked the board members for their gifts?” Major red flag. Expecting staff to solicit board members is a recipe for low giving. This is the responsibility of the board chair or chair of the board development committee.
  7. “You don’t need to know my travel plans.” This closes the door to fund development and fundraising opportunities. Your staff can suggest visits to current or potential major donors and influencers, help coordinate a friendraiser, or a visit to a foundation or corporation who funds nonprofits similar to yours.

Other favorites include:

  1. “I want you to raise 50% more than you did last year.”
  2. “I’m launching the campaign in spite of what the feasibility study says.”
  3. “We don’t need to be spending money on a feasibility study.”
  4. “I underestimated: we have a short fall of 20% that you will need to raise.”
  5. “I want you to represent me at the chamber meeting.”
  6. “I want you to make the case before the community foundation, I need to be at the Save the Duck conference in Idaho.”
  7. “What should be our fundraising priorities be for this year (this campaign?)”
  8. “Who were our top five donors last year?”
  9. “Send me an email about your fundraising plans.”
  10. “Tell me, who is currently on the development committee.”
  11. “I don’t want you talking to any board members.”
  12. “I need to cut the budget by 10% – that includes your department as well. And I need you to raise an additional 15%.”
  13. “I’m sorry, you will have to host our VIP guests.”
  14. “I think we can do the campaign without an increase in staff or budget.”

Statements like these drive development professionals crazy, contributing to high turnover. If you don’t know why these statements can put your organization or institution at risk ask your development staff. If you’re not that brave, ask a peer who is a successful fundraiser.

Next week: things development professionals say.

Mel and Pearl Shaw are the authors of “Prerequisites for Fundraising Success” and “The Fundraiser’s Guide to Soliciting Gifts.” They provide fundraising counsel to nonprofits. Visit them at www.saadandshaw.com. Follow them on Twitter: @saadshaw.

 

How to use business cards as a prospecting tool

mprove your relationship w your development director: idea for joint prospectingNonprofit CEOs, board chairs, and college presidents are constantly out and about meeting people and picking up business cards. Here’s what we know: you can use those cards to stack the deck in favor of your fundraising success. Business cards also hold the key strengthening your relationship with your development director or vice president for advancement. Our recommendation is tried and true: collect the cards, when you have a moment at the end of the day write short notes about each of your meetings. Send the notes and a photo of the cards back to your staff when you are on the road. Or submit them when back in the office. This gets the names, contact information, and notes about relationships and opportunities into your database. Next step: partnering with your development person.

Call a debriefing session with your development director or vice president. Review each of the business cards you collected. Share with her the key insights you learned from each of your meetings. Working together, prioritize next steps for how to engage each person you met. Some follow up items are simple: sending a report or web resource you discussed; making an introduction; ensuring an invitation to upcoming events is sent. Others are more complex. Perhaps one of the people you met with could assist in evaluating a partnership you want to pursue. Maybe you met a corporate manager who wants to engage her employees in a day of service at your nonprofit. Determine who is responsible for taking the relationship to the next level and by when. Set check-in and follow-up dates with each other and keep them.

This practice gives you a “door opener” for regularly meeting with your development person, a way to be actively engaged with her in developing new relationships and partnerships. You are sharing contacts and information with her – “bringing something to the table” instead of always asking her how much money she has raised. You are increasing the prospects you both can work with, sharing some details of your work, and creating an opportunity for the two of you to strategize together. This process can be a stimulus for new ideas and perspectives. You can work shoulder to shoulder, learning from each other, co-creating goals and opportunities, and making commitments to each other regarding how to follow up with and engage the people you have met. It can energize you, expand your mind-set and help build a culture of fundraising.

Here are two truths about business cards and fundraising: a card can’t open a door if its sitting in a pile on your desk. Your development person can’t turn a pile of cards into relationships. The two of you need to work together, be creative, and follow up.

Mel and Pearl Shaw are the authors of “Prerequisites for Fundraising Success” and “The Fundraiser’s Guide to Soliciting Gifts.” They provide fundraising counsel to nonprofits. Visit them at www.saadandshaw.com. Follow them on Twitter: @saadshaw.

Are you begging or fundraising?

Are you begging or fundraising

Fundraising is a noble profession. As a fundraiser you meet some of the best people around. You provide people with information and opportunities that allow them to pursue things that are important to them: “things” that really can’t be bought. You can’t buy an end to world hunger, gun violence, AIDS or domestic violence: you have to give. When you ask people to give you bring people together with projects, programs and institutions that align with their beliefs. You help people realize some of their highest aspirations.

Money doesn’t change the world: it funds organizations and institutions who bring together people who change the world. Giving – and knowing which organizations to give to – is vitally important. And that’s where fundraisers come in. Whether as a professional or a volunteer, fundraisers are bringing together people, resources and organizations so that visions can become reality.

Fundraising is far from begging and yet that is the message too many of us have internalized. We hesitate to ask others to give to nonprofits we believe in. We think of ourselves as “beggars” and unconsciously teach our children that fundraising is begging. Think about the language we use: “Oh, they’re always begging for money.” Or, “I can’t even go to church without all that begging.” Or, “he’s always trying to get his hand in my pocket.”

These negative messages keep us from feeling confident when inviting others to join us in giving. If you feel negative it is hard to inspire others. Sometimes the negativity comes from not knowing how to answer questions people may ask. That can be fixed – read up on the organization and ask for support in role playing.

Here are some other considerations. Maybe you feel insecure asking for money for yourself and you project that onto soliciting gifts for a nonprofit. Maybe you feel uncomfortable talking about money, period. The feeling of “begging” can arise when soliciting people who are not your peers. That can put you in a “one down” position, and bring up feelings of powerlessness or resentment. To cure this, we suggest asking people who are of similar financial means to you.

Maybe you are afraid of rejection. We have a cure for that too: remember, if someone doesn’t give they are not rejecting you. They may not have the money. Or, your project may not be the one they want to give to. People have different priorities. Finally, you may not want to ask because then you will feel obligated to “return the favor” and you don’t want to be beholden to anyone. These are all reasonable fears. But they can be overcome. Look at what’s driving your behavior and learn how to overcome your fears and become a driving force in fundraising.

Image courtesy of imagerymajestic / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Mel and Pearl Shaw are the authors of “Prerequisites for Fundraising Success” and “The Fundraiser’s Guide to Soliciting Gifts.” They provide fundraising counsel to nonprofits. Visit them at www.saadandshaw.com. Follow them on Twitter: @saadshaw.

Six Things You Can Do As a Board Member

InitiativeCalling all nonprofit board members: Do you sometimes wonder what value you bring to the nonprofits you serve? Do you wish you were more engaged, or that “they” took more advantage of the talents you bring to the board? We have the solution for you: take initiative! Don’t wait for someone to ask you to get involved.

Here are six things you can do between now and the next board meeting to energize yourself and your fellow board members. Choose one or more that sounds like fun to you. Each can help engage new supporters, increase awareness and raise money. These tips work if you are involved with university, a grassroots organization, or any size nonprofit in-between.

First, write a thank you note or personally call a donor to thank them for their gift. Allocate five minutes for the conversation. Ask what encouraged them to give and what attracts them to your organization. Listen. Respond to any questions they may have. Thank them again.

Second, invite a potential supporter to visit the organization’s facilities and observe its programs. Agree on a date and time to meet at the nonprofit and tour together. Request that a staff member join you – one who can share information and answer questions.

Third, visit staff members to get to know them and ask “what can I do to help?” Follow through on what you learn.

Fourth, have lunch with a fellow board member to discuss how the two of you can work together to increase awareness or raise funds. Hatch a plan that can be implemented without staff involvement. Follow through on your ideas.

Fifth, make arrangements to speak before a local organization to share information about your nonprofit. It could be your church, the rotary, or your book club. Keep your comments brief and engaging.

Sixth, host a small fundraising event. Invite a few close friends and associates to your home or office for coffee or an evening glass of wine. Spend five minutes sharing information about the nonprofit you serve and ask each guest to make a gift equal to or greater than your gift.

Before implementing these suggestions, take a moment to identify the three things you want to communicate about why you give your time and talent to serve on the board. Share these in conversation or through your presentation. Let people know you are accessible if they have questions in the future, or if they want to get involved. Share your contact information. Bring a simple brochure to share.

Anyone of these activities will extend the reach of your nonprofit. They will energize you. You will have something new to report at the next board meeting. Don’t wait for someone to “assign” you to a task. Jump in!

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Mel and Pearl Shaw are the authors of “Prerequisites for Fundraising Success” and “The Fundraiser’s Guide to Soliciting Gifts.” They provide fundraising counsel to nonprofits. Visit them at www.saadandshaw.com. Follow them on Twitter: @saadshaw.

Three Steps to launch a comprehensive campaign

Part two of a two part series….Read part One: Four Benefits of a Comprehensive Fundraising Campaign

Three Steps to comprehensive Campaign, an acquaintance blurted out, “comprehensive campaigns are nothing but a con game.” Three steps to ensure your campaign meets its goals

We were taken aback when, in casual conversation, an acquaintance blurted out, “comprehensive campaigns are nothing but a con game.” We listened as he shared his experience of institutions that report campaign success but don’t have the money needed to implement projects laid out as campaign priorities.

While we wouldn’t be so blunt in our assessment, we do agree that a lot can happen in a comprehensive campaign that leaves donors and the community confused and feeling misled. But, comprehensive campaigns don’t have to end that way. We present the following example to share three steps you can take to ensure your campaign meets its goals and has the money to implement priorities.

Let’s say a nonprofit provides healthcare for children ages birth to three years old. It launches a three year $20 million comprehensive campaign for the following: $9 million for annual operations for three years ($3 million a year), $6 million for capital costs for a new medical facility, and $5 million to endow future costs for pediatric services. During the campaign a local philanthropist wants to donate $15 million to provide healthcare services to uninsured local residents regardless of age, and a foundation wants to donate $6 million for childcare services. If the nonprofit accepts these gifts it will raise $21 million but there will be no money for annual operations, the medical facility or endowment of pediatric services. Would this be campaign success?

Consider these three steps before launching your campaign. First, be clear on what you are raising money for. Define your priorities and how much you need to raise for each.

Second, determine which gifts will be counted towards the campaign goal, and which will be counted as what we refer to as “over and above” gifts. For example, when you accept gifts that are outside campaign priorities record them, publicize them, but don’t count these towards your campaign goal as they cannot be used to finance campaign priorities. When you do raise the funds for your campaign priorities be sure to declare success and communicate that you met goal and raised funds for additional projects as well.

The third step is to establish a reporting system that can track how much has been raised towards each priority. Gifts should be appropriately recorded and tied to a priority. Management reports should clearly communicate this information so everyone is aware of overall campaign progress, and progress towards each specific priority.

Here’s our bottom line: Make sure your comprehensive campaign raises money for its stated priorities. Don’t be derailed by an abundance of non-priority related gifts. Be clear and transparent about how you account for gifts received. Decide how you define campaign success and communicate it clearly: don’t leave your community asking “where’s the money?”

Mel and Pearl Shaw are the authors of “Prerequisites for Fundraising Success” and “The Fundraiser’s Guide to Soliciting Gifts.” They provide fundraising counsel to nonprofits. Visit them at www.saadandshaw.com. Follow them on Twitter: @saadshaw.

Four Benefits of a Comprehensive Fundraising Campaign

Part one of a two part series

comprehensive fundaraising campaigns,  annual campaign, capital campaign, comprehensive campaign, coordinating fundraising campaigns, fundraising, fundraising campaig, how to grow your fundraising, nonprofit campaigns

Do you need to raise money for your nonprofit? If you answer “yes”, you are in good company. Fundraising is critical for most nonprofits and it takes time to build relationships that generate the revenue needed to operate. Organizing your fundraising into a campaign with specific financial goals and timelines is one way to focus on revenue and invite others to join you in fundraising.

The most common campaign is the annual campaign. This is a campaign to raise funds for annual programs and operations. Funding may come from foundation or corporate grants, individuals and families, events, and/or government sources. Gifts may be large or small. Another type of campaign is the capital campaign. This is a campaign to raise funds for assets such as buildings, equipment, furnishings or an endowment. The financial goal is typically such that it cannot be paid for with an increase in annual funds. It is a milestone occurrence within the life of the nonprofit that requires major investment. A major gifts campaign refers to a campaign to raise funds through large gifts. Unlike the other campaigns, funds may be used for multiple purposes as the name refers to the types of gifts a nonprofit seeks to secure. A comprehensive campaign is a campaign that coordinates multiple campaigns into one.

A major benefit of conducting a comprehensive campaign is that it focuses an organization’s energies into one campaign with multiple goals and revenue sources. It reduces confusion amongst prospective donors, allows them to make a one-time decision on how to support your diverse needs, and reduces duplication of efforts on the part of the nonprofit. For example, if you are raising funds for annual needs and simultaneously raising funds for a building you may find that an annual solicitation was made of an individual with the capacity and interest to give to your capital campaign. If the two campaigns are not coordinated you may receive a meaningful annual gift, but lose the opportunity to ask for a gift that combines annual and capital giving. Returning to donors multiple times within a year is not always possible, and the donor may have thought the first solicitation represented your needs for the year.

A comprehensive campaign also allows donors who give small gifts to feel a part of a major campaign. The value of their annual giving is made clear through campaign marketing messages and they are encouraged to be a part of the larger campaign as well. With a larger financial goal a comprehensive campaign can create buzz and excitement that re-engages lapsed annual donors, or encourages annual donors to increase their giving. A comprehensive campaign is not “business as usual” and that excitement can attract new donors and fundraising volunteers.

Next week: comprehensive campaign challenges.

Mel and Pearl Shaw are the authors of “Prerequisites for Fundraising Success” and “The Fundraiser’s Guide to Soliciting Gifts.” They provide fundraising counsel to nonprofits. Visit them at www.saadandshaw.com. Follow them on Twitter: @saadshaw.

Four Ways to Grow Your Alumni Association

Part two of a two part series on alumni fundraising

Four ways to grow your alumni association

Alumni associations offer memberships and raise funds for the colleges and universities they are associated with. Many are independent nonprofit organizations, others operate as part of the institution’s alumni relations department. Some colleges have both an alumni relations department and an independent alumni association. Sometimes alumni fundraising efforts are coordinated, sometimes they are haphazard, and other times there is overt conflict between alumni and their alma mater. In our work with colleges and alumni we witness the good, the bad and the ugly. Here are four suggestions for how to grow your alumni association’s fundraising program.

First, open communication between alumni and college leadership is a must. If you are an alumni leader we recommend regularly scheduled meetings with the president or chancellor Develop a relationship. Learn his or her vision for the institution. Ask questions. Explore ways in which alumni can partner to advance the vision. Most importantly learn the president’s fundraising priorities and expectations of alumni as donors. Share the concerns and interests of alumni. Most importantly find common ground. Differences of opinion will always exist. Move beyond those to create a shared vision that strengthens the relationship between alumni, their alma mater and current and future students.

Second, don’t confuse membership and fundraising. Purchasing an alumni association membership is the first step not the only one. In general membership provides networking opportunities with other alumni and benefits such as discounts and access to events. Giving to your alumni association – or to your alma mater through the alumni association – is how you provide financial support for the institution and current/future students. When giving to your alumni association ask what your gift will support. If you are responsible for soliciting alumni, make sure your solicitations clearly communicate the use of funds. Let your members know when they are supporting the work of the association and when they are supporting their alma mater. Be transparent.

Third, before launching a meaningful alumni giving program conduct a feasibility study to learn how alumni want to be engaged, what they want to give to, what is important to them in their relationship with their alma mater, and why they don’t give. Just because you think something is a good idea doesn’t mean alumni will give.

Finally, when engaging recent college graduates encourage giving that is appropriate for early career salaries. Be aware of the financial impact of student loan payments. Remember that alumni who are the first in their family to obtain a college degree who may be supporting other family members. Offer opportunities for engagement such as assisting with student recruitment, serving as a mentor for a potential or current student, hosting an event, or volunteering at an on-campus or local college event.

Mel and Pearl Shaw are the authors of “Prerequisites for Fundraising Success” and “The Fundraiser’s Guide to Soliciting Gifts.” They provide fundraising counsel to nonprofits. Visit them at www.saadandshaw.com. Follow them on Twitter: @saadshaw.

Three Keys to Building a Successful Alumni Relations Program

alumni giving, alumni association, uncf, hbcu, hbcu fundraising,alumni relations, How to build a successful alumni relations program

Colleges and universities look to alumni for financial support. If you attended or graduated from college you likely receive fundraising solicitations from your alma mater. Some colleges excel at engaging their alumni and raising money from them. Their programs have been built over generations: first year students are encouraged to set alumni giving as a personal goal. Other institutions such as community colleges are newer to engaging alumni. Many historically black colleges and universities also face challenges.

According to the Council for Aid to Education 2013 Voluntary Support for Education report alumni provide 27% of gifts to higher education, contributing $9 billion. This is second only to giving by foundations (30% and $10 billion). Don’t overlook your alumni. Consider these three keys to building a successful alumni giving program.

First, as with all fundraising, make a strong case for giving. The fact that an individual attended or graduated from your institution is not a good enough reason for a person to give. Take the time to create a case that speaks to alumni in general and then tailor the case to communicate to alumni of different generations. Communicate the president’s vision for the future of the institution and provide facts and figures such as current enrollment; male/female ratio; student and graduation rates; five programs with the highest enrollment; five inspiring alumni; and the college’s local economic impact. Let alumni know the current price of annual tuition and fees and the average amount of debt that students graduate with.  Encourage giving for scholarships and general operating support.

Second, keep a focus on retaining current alumni donors, engaging new ones, and re-engaging lapsed alumni. Be patient and consistent. Measure your results. Use multiple methods to engage alumni: direct mail, social media, special events, one-on-one solicitation. Don’t look for a quick home run: major donors typically have a relationship with their alma mater that has grown over time. Offer opportunities for engagement with other alumni and current students.

Third, if you are responsible for hiring and managing alumni relations employees take the time to make the right hire. Alumni relations should not be the “resting place” for long-tenured and well-loved employees. These positions should be filled by individuals who can work from a fundraising plan and implement multiple strategies for engaging diverse alumni. There should be annual goals for donor retention, new donors, and average gift size. Consider the obligations alumni may face at different points in their lives and set goals for those in their first five years out of college, those who are 10 years out, and those who are older alumni. Know your costs: the alumni relations department should have fundraising goals that take into consideration the cost to operate the department and that tie into the institution’s overall fundraising goal.

Mel and Pearl Shaw are the authors of “Prerequisites for Fundraising Success” and “The Fundraiser’s Guide to Soliciting Gifts.” They provide fundraising counsel to nonprofits. Visit them at www.saadandshaw.com. Follow them on Twitter: @saadshaw.

Black Gives Back

Tracy Webb, women fundraisers, women philanthropists, next generation philanthropists, African American philanthropy, fundraising, BlackGivesBackIf you want to challenge your thinking on the relationship between African Americans and philanthropy you need to follow BlackGivesBack.com. Founded by Tracey Webb in 2007, BlackGivesBack.com takes the stereotype of African Americans as the recipients of others’ philanthropy and illustrates – with images and words – that African Americans are busy giving to diverse causes.

We met with Webb this past fall, and followed up with her recently, asking about the driving force behind BlackGivesBack. “I grew tired of not seeing the rich stories of African American giving in the media. We’re often stereotyped as recipients of philanthropy when in fact we give away 25% more of our income than whites. This has been documented by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation’s Cultures of Giving report published in 2012. Black giving is what created many churches and institutions still in existence today.”

An active donor, Webb is also the founder of Black Benefactors, a giving circle in Washington, DC. She gives and encourages others to join together and increase the impact of their giving. “I have learned that while we want to give back, we may not have the knowledge on where to start or how to do it effectively to create desired change. By joining a giving circle, you can learn more in depth about needs in your community and how to give more strategically. I have observed in the past few years that this type of collaborative giving model is on the rise, especially among millennials.”

“One event that I have found inspiring is the annual Community Investment Network (CIN) conference. CIN is an organization that provides support and resources to giving circles in communities of color. As the founder of a giving circle, there’s something powerful about being surrounded by grassroots givers – everyday people committed to giving back in their communities. They are celebrating their 10th anniversary this October in Raleigh, North Carolina.”

Webb was inspired at an early age. “Philanthropists that are the most inspiring to me are my parents and family. I grew up in a family of givers and I was never told to give back. I learned it from watching them. I’m about to embark on researching my family history and I’m excited to learn more about the giving of my ancestors. I’ve heard some amazing stories!”

Webb is busy growing BlackGivesBack. “My hope and vision for BlackGivesBack.com is to revamp the site with new features and expanded content. I want it to serve as a hub for learning about issues impacting our community and the organizations and individuals committed to addressing them. And as our buying power continues to increase, I hope that readers will include giving in their family budget to support non-profit organizations in addition to their place of worship.

Learn more at www.BlackGivesBack.com and www.thecommunityinvestment.org.

Mel and Pearl Shaw are the authors of “Prerequisites for Fundraising Success” and “The Fundraiser’s Guide to Soliciting Gifts.” They provide fundraising counsel to nonprofits. Visit them at www.saadandshaw.com. Follow them on Twitter: @saadshaw.